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Would Breathalyzer tests in Georgia bars help prevent DUI?

| Mar 1, 2014 | DUI

Breathalyzer test devices are being attached to cell phones and being installed in bars throughout the nation. In one state, certain lawmakers are proposing legislation that would require every bar to have an alcohol breath testing device. However, can residents of the state of Georgia really trust these devices to prevent them from getting arrested for DUI?

According to statistics, approximately 50 percent of DUI-related deaths involved a driver who had a blood alcohol level of at least .16 or more. Police use Breathalyzer tests to check the blood alcohol content of drivers quickly. However, even the professional grade breath tests utilized by law enforcement are known to have problems with accuracy. In fact, certain estimates claim that 25 percent of Breathalyzer test results are totally inaccurate.

By employing a skilled legal defense, which takes into account the limitations of a particular breath test, it may be possible to have Breathalyzer evidence ruled inadmissible in a specific DUI case. Studies have also shown that breath tests can be manipulated by as much as 10 percent by hyperventilating prior to taking the test. Even certain brands of chewing gum and Listerine mouthwash are known to cause false breath test results.

Considering the inaccuracies associated with breath test results, it seems that having Breathalyzer tests installed in bars may not be of significant assistance to drivers. In fact, a false test result could cause an inebriated individual to feel safe driving when the exact opposite may be the case. Indeed, Georgia courts agree that Breathalyzer tests may be invalid, and many drivers accused of DUI have obtained verdicts of not guilty after getting improper evidence thrown out of court.

Source: inquisitr.com, Breathalyzer In Bars May Not Be Accurate, Machine Test Could Mislead, No author, Feb. 15, 2014

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