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University of Georgia student goes to chapel and gets...arrested?

Last week, a University of Georgia student who went to the chapel will not be taking care of some new legal matters because of a marriage. The student was arrested at the University Chapel after campus police reported that the man was drunk and had fallen asleep outside of the building. The student now faces charges for alcohol-related offenses.

When a campus police officer approached the student on March 30, the student allegedly told the officer that he had been drinking. He also allegedly told the officer that he was only 19 years old. In Georgia, underage students can be arrested and charged with alcohol-related offenses if police have reason to believe that the student is in possession of alcohol or has consumed alcohol.

According to the UGA police report, the officer noted that the student's eyes were bloodshot and that the student also smelled of alcohol. The student allegedly told police that he was drunk when asked about falling asleep at the Chapel. The campus officer verified the student's identity and discovered that the student was only 19 years old. During a search after the student's arrest, police also found a fake ID in his wallet. The student was charged with possessing a fake ID and underage possession of alcohol.

The UGA student may have made some poor decisions leading up to his arrest after passing out on the University Chapel steps, but he -- and other students who have been arrested for underage drinking -- can make smarter decisions when it comes to protecting their rights and fighting any criminal charges. These individuals can seek assistance from an attorney who is experienced with defending and providing reliable advice to underage UGA students who have been accused of a variety of offenses.

Source: The Red & Black, "University student arrested after being found on the steps of the Chapel," Joshua Johnson, March 31, 2012