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Head of FAA who lead safety initiative charged with drunk driving

As we have previously discussed on our Athens, Georgia, DUI law blog, individuals accused of driving under the influence face a variety of legal consequences depending on the circumstances of one's arrest. But after serving jail time or paying fines if one is convicted of DUI, individuals may discover that moving on with their lives after a conviction is more difficult than what they might have imagined. For this reason, it is important that the rights and reputations of those who are charged with drunk driving are properly defended.

Last week, we discussed the additional penalties a college football coach faced after he was arrested for drunk driving. This week, the head of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was placed on leave following his arrest for allegedly driving under the influence of alcohol. The man was nominated in 2009 by President Obama to head the FAA.

According to reports, the 65-year-old man's position at the FAA could now be in jeopardy. Despite serving as a pilot for more than 25 years and implementing initiatives to improve safety in the airline industry, the administrator announced that he will take a leave of absence while the Department of Transportation decides his fate with the FAA.

The arrest occurred Dec. 3 in Virginia. A patrol officer reported that he spotted a vehicle that was traveling on the wrong side of a road. After stopping the vehicle and suspecting the driver of driving under the influence, the officer charged the administrator with drunk driving. According to the officer, the man was cooperative during the incident, he was not involved in an accident and he did not have any passengers in the vehicle with him.

The results of the man's blood alcohol test have not been reported, but the legal limit is 0.08.

Source: Fox News, "Head of FAA Placed on Leave After Drunken-Driving Arrest," Dec. 5, 2011