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Effectiveness of DUI checkpoints debated in Georgia, around U.S.: Part 2

As discussed in the previous post, a recent article in the Times-Georgian discusses the debate for and against DUI checkpoints in Georgia and around the U.S. Law enforcement officers say that the checkpoints help keep people who are driving under the influence off the roads and also catch people who are driving with a revoked or suspended driver's license. In the course of the checkpoint, people are also arrested for drug possession or outstanding warrants, or cited for seat belt and child safety seat violations, among other citations.

The debate has partly come up because new apps for smart phones offer to alert motorists to where DUI checkpoints are set up in their areas. A coalition of a few U.S. Senators is trying to get these apps taken off the market. Some law enforcement officers interviewed in the article said that they believe that the apps promote drunk driving and say they would prefer an app that helps intoxicated people find a cab ride home. These officers also believe that the apps enable drivers to drink as much alcohol as they would like to and simply avoid checkpoints.

Other officers say that the apps do not affect the number of DUI arrests. Still others say that they are not worried about the apps and that they are more likely to help non-intoxicated people avoid the inconvenience of a checkpoint, rather than tip-off someone who is highly intoxicated.

Law enforcement generally argues that the sobriety checkpoints are proactive and seek to prevent accidents. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that sobriety checkpoints reduce the numbers of car accidents involving an alcohol-impaired driver.

Source:

Law enforcement agencies say DUI checkpoints are effective (Times-Georgian)