Daniels & Rothman, P.C. map & directions
toll free: local:
866-422-8045 706-621-5166

call us now for a free consultation

Athens GA DUI Law Blog

Underage drinking has immediate and long-term consequences

Even the most attentive parents may be shocked to learn how young many kids are when they start drinking -- too often with serious and even fatal results. According to the National Institute on Alcohol and Alcoholism, more than a third of teens have consumed at least one drink by the time they're 15. Nearly two-thirds have drunk alcohol by the time they reach 18.

Of particular risk is binge drinking, which is defined as having five or more drinks at one time. While many people associate that with fraternity and sorority parties, more than 90 percent of the alcohol consumption by those in the 12-to-20 range is through binge drinking. While boys and girls drink approximately the same amount overall, as adolescents get older, males are more likely to binge drink than females.

Frito-Lay aims to decrease drunk driving on Super Bowl Sunday

Frito-Lay is partnering with Uber and Mothers Against Drunk Driving to keep intoxicated drivers off the road this upcoming Super Bowl Sunday. The snack giant has created a special limited addition Tostitos "Party Safe" bag to encourage people to get home safely.

The bag is equipped with technology that detects alcohol on a person's breath. When someone breathes into the bag, if any alcohol is detected, the sensor forms a big red steering wheel image on the bag with the words "Don't Drink and Drive." It also provides an Uber code. When drivers enter that code into the Uber app on game day (Feb. 5), they get $10 off their ride. They can also tap the bag with their phone, and an Uber ride will be summoned automatically.

DUIs can result from a range of legal drugs

Most people assume charges of driving under the influence involve overindulging on alcoholic beverages. However, DUI charges cover a wide range of drugs, both illegal and legal, prescription and over-the-counter.

In every state in the country, if a person's driving is determined to be impaired by any drug(s), he or she can be arrested and potentially convicted of DUI.

Georgia teen kills himself after police break up party

Fulton County authorities say that a 14-year-old high school student took his own life the day after police were called to a party at his home that allegedly involved underage drinking and marijuana use. According to the medical examiner's office, the teen shot himself.

The boy's parents were away at the time of the party at the family's home in Milton. He was left with his 20-year-old sister, who reportedly was participating in the activities.

Helping college students fight alcohol and drug-related charges

One of the most frightening experiences a parent can face is learning that their child was arrested. Even kids who have never been in trouble with the law sometimes make poor decisions when they go away to college and don't have mom and dad keeping tabs on them.

Alcohol and drugs can be plentiful on and around campus. Sometimes kids who come to the University of Georgia from other states aren't familiar with the legal age for drinking.

The dangers of underage drinking for teens and preteens

Many parents of teens and even preteens would be shocked to learn just how easy it is for their kids to get ahold of alcohol. The dangers of overconsumption of alcohol for young people can be particularly dangerous because they may not know when to say when.

As one doctor notes, the frontal lobe in many teens is not fully developed, so their decision-making skills still need some work. Of course, as with most everyone, alcohol can also impact reaction time, balance, motor concentration, concentration and attention.

Why parents are installing ignition interlock devices in cars

Ignition interlock devices are often ordered for people who have been convicted of one or more DUIs in order for offenders to get their driver's licenses back. IIDs are essentially Breathalyzers connected to the ignition that determine whether drivers have alcohol on their breath. If they do, their vehicles won't start.

States that require IIDs for all people convicted of DUIs have seen a significant reduction in drunk-driving fatalities. Some 22 states require them for even first time DUI convictions.

Talk to your kids about drinking before holiday parties begin

As the holiday season rolls around, along with the attendant social gatherings, there will be more opportunities than ever for young people under the legal drinking age to have access to alcohol. Even if they're not exposed to it at parties with friends, teens and even younger kids often get a hold of alcohol from their own homes from bars and kitchens stocked for parties.

Kids who have little or no experience with alcohol can suffer serious physical effects from even a few drinks. Consuming a large amount of alcohol in a short period can be fatal. There can be legal ramifications as well. In Georgia, they could face a minor in possession charge for possessing and/or consuming alcohol.

How can energy drinks lead to drunk driving?

Many University of Georgia students, like college students around the country, have come to rely on energy drinks to provide the caffeine they need to stay awake and alert through the night to cram for exams and finish papers. These highly-caffeinated drinks, if overused, can present some health dangers. However, combining them with alcohol, as many students do, can pose particularly serious risks.

Warnings by the Food and Drug Administration in 2010 have largely resulted in energy drinks containing alcohol being removed from the marketplace in the U.S. However, it's easy enough for students to combine alcohol and energy drinks on their own.

Michael's Law now in effect in Georgia

As homecoming week at the University of Georgia unfolds, it's a good time to review a law that took effect this summer that can impact the festivities.

On July 1, Michael's Law went into effect, preventing those who are younger than 21 from being employed as bouncers in bars, among other things. The law was named for Michael Gatto, a student at Georgia Southern University who died in a Statesboro bar after getting into an altercation with a bouncer. The bouncer, who was 20 at the time, was sentenced this week to 20 years in prison.